Clotted cream – also known as clouted or Cornish cream – is a pasteurized, thick cream made with full cow’s milk. It has a smooth, velvety consistency and a rich creamy taste. Clotted cream is often used in cream tea or as a spread on scones. This dairy product can be used as an ingredient for hot and cold desserts too – including fudge and ice cream.

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Now if say, you have leftover clotted cream, how do you keep the leftovers? Can you freeze clotted cream? Although clotted cream can be stored in the fridge, freezing will extend its shelf life. And get this, clotted cream freezes so well!

Of course, once the clotted cream is defrosted there will be slight texture changes, this goes especially for dairy cream that’s been frozen for far too long. Ice crystals could form within the cream, altering the texture of the dairy product. That said, the clotted cream is still safe to eat but it’s best used in baking and cooking.

When kept in the fridge, clotted cream will keep for 2 to 3 weeks. But when kept in the freezer, the cream’s shelf life is extended to 4 months or more. Below is a step by step guide on how can you freeze clotted cream:

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How to Freeze Clotted Cream?

The key to freezing clotted cream properly is to 1) freeze the product in small batches and 2) buy it fresh and freeze the cream as soon as possible.

Freezing Unopened Packs of Clotted Cream

For unopened packs of clotted cream, there is no need to transfer the product into a different container prior to freezing unless the original packaging comes in a tin. Just stick the clotted cream in the freezer, original packaging and all, and you’re done.For

For tinned clotted cream, you have to transfer the product in an airtight container. Just spoon the clotted cream in a rigid plastic container with an airtight lid. Close the lid, write the storage date with a marker then stick in the freezer.

Freezing Leftover Clotted Cream

For leftover clotted cream, spoon the product into an airtight container. Leave a couple of inch of space before sealing the container. Write the storage date with a marker and stick in the freezer.

On the other hand, if you’d like to divide the clotted cream into smaller portions, you can use small resealable baggies. This way, thawing the cream will be much easier. Again, just spoon the cream into each bag; squeeze as much air as you can prior to sealing then stick in the freezer.

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How to Defrost Frozen Clotted Cream?

To defrost frozen clotted cream, just transfer the cream from the freezer to the fridge. Leave the cream to thaw overnight. Once the clotted cream has been thawed completely, it’s now ready to use. One thing though, you have to consume the thawed clotted cream, never re-freeze the leftovers. Refreezing thawed clotted cream will increase the risk of texture and flavor changes.

Summary

Clotted cream is a staple in tea time, it makes the finest scones taste even better. Although clotted cream is quite delicate, it’s good to know that you can freeze this dairy product to extend its shelf life. Now that you know how can you freeze clotted cream, go ahead and take advantage of that sale. Buy clotted cream in bulk and store the rest in the freezer!